Business Studies & Computing

Teaching Staff
Mr D Thomson (Head of Faculty), Business and Computing
Mr O Ford Business & Economics, Computing
Mrs D Kershaw Computing & ICT
Mr C Penn Business, Computing and ICT
Miss E Smith Business, Computing and ICT

Contact the Faculty by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Summary of Homework Arrangements

GCSE and GCE
Homework will be set on a weekly basis. Students are recommended to re-read notes and resources from lessons and regularly review main topics and concepts, making further notes to consolidate learning and aid retention of facts. Notes and resources should be read prior the next lesson.


Business

GCSE Business

How is the subject examined?Business Studies

This is a highly-relevant and engaging course, designed to deepen candidates understanding of the way in which businesses operate in a dynamic, changing and competitive environment.

The new scheme is assessed through two external examinations, Business Dynamics and Business Considerations.

Business Dynamics accounts for 62.5% of the marks and Business Considerations accounts for 37.5% of the marks. The final exams will happen in June of Year 11.

During the course you will study topics that are directly relevant to the business world and you will learn practical skills that employers are looking for.

What will I study?

  1. Business Activity – how businesses meet the needs of customers by providing a product or service
  2. Influences on Business—understand that businesses operate in an external environment and understand the external influences that impact on business activity
  3. Business Operations - how to ensure quality products and prices make a profit
  4. Human resource - how to recruit and motivate the right staff for your business.
  5. Marketing - how to identify, anticipate and satisfy customer needs in a profitable way
  6. Finance - how to manage cash flow and understand profit and loss accounts, balance sheets and other key financial theory

What Post 16 choices will studying this subject lead to?

The GCSE course is an ideal introduction to Business Studies and forms a solid foundation for continuing to A Level studies at our Sixth Form or indeed, for following further studies or an apprenticeship in Business.


GCE A Level Business

Component 1

Business Opportunities and Functions
Written Examination: 2 hours 15 minutes: 33.3% of qualification

  • Section A - Compulsory short-answer questions
  • Section B - Compulsory data response questions
    To assess Business Opportunities and Business Functions. (Total marks 80)

Component 2

Business Analysis and Strategy
Written Examination: 2 hour 15 minutes: 33.3% of qualification

  • Compulsory data response and structured questions.
  • To assess business strategy and analytical techniques used in the business decision-making process.
  • The subject content in Component 1 will underpin the context for Business Analysis and Strategy. (Total marks 80)

Component 3

Business in a Changing World
Written Examination: 2 hour 15 minutes: 33.3% of qualification

  • Section A - Compulsory questions based on case study
  • Section B - One synoptic essay from a choice of three
    To assess all of the A level subject content. (Total marks 80)
A Level Economics

Awarding Body

AQA

Course Description

Students must have achieved a minimum of GCSE Grade B in mathematics for entry onto this course.

Economics is the social science that studies economic activity to gain an understanding of the processes that govern the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in an economy.

Economics focuses on the behavior and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Consistent with this focus, primary textbooks often distinguish between microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics examines the behavior of basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions.

Economics aims to solve fundamental questions such as why does poverty exist in the 21st century, how can the UK economy compete in an ever-changing globalised market and is capitalism a flawed mechanism for distributing the worlds scarce resources?

Higher Education Opportunities

The course is accepted for entry onto a wide range of higher education courses including economics, business studies, accountancy and business finance.

How might it develop employability skills that universities or employers will be looking for?

A-Level Economics helps students:

  • develop an interest and enthusiasm for economics and its contribution to the wider political and social environment
  • develop an understanding of a range of concepts and acquire an ability to use these concepts in a variety of different contexts
  • develop an enquiring, critical and thoughtful 'economist's mind'
  • develop an understanding of current economic issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life
  • apply economic concepts and theories in a range of contexts and appreciate their value and limitations in explaining real world phenomena
  • analyse, explain and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the market economy and the role of government within it

How is the course arranged and assessed?

Core components:

  Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4
What's Assessed Unit 1 – ECON1
Economics: Markets and Market Failure
Unit 2 – ECON2
Economics: The National Economy
Unit 3 – ECON3
Economics: Business Economics and the Distribution of Income
Unit 4 – ECON4
Economics: The National and International Economy
Assessment 25% of A Level
1 hr 15 mins examination
75 marks (100 UMS)
25% of A Level
1 hr 15 mins examination
75 marks (100 UMS)
25% of A Level2 hr examination
80 marks (100 UMS)
25% of A Level2 hr examination
80 marks (100 UMS)
Types of Questions

Section A:
25 compulsory objective test items (25 marks)

Section B: Two optional data response questions are set; candidates answer one.
(50 marks)

Section A: 
25 compulsory objective test items (25 marks)

Section B: Two optional data response questions are set; candidates answer one.
(50 marks)

Section A:
Two optional data re-sponse questions are set; candidates answer one.
(40 marks)
One question will always relate to the global context and the other to the European Union context.

Section B:
Three optional essay questions are set; candidates answer one.
(40 marks)

Section A: 
Two optional data re-sponse questions are set; candidates answer one.
(40 marks) 
One question will always relate to the global context and the other to the European Union context.

Section B: 
Three optional essay questions are set; candidates answer one.
(40 marks)


 

Computing

GCSE ComputingComputer Science

Computer Science GCSE

How is the subject examined?

Students undertake 1 controlled assessment covering practical programming. The task is set by the AQA exam board.

There are also 2 written exams lasting 1 Hour 30 minutes each, which examine students' understanding of the theoretical aspects of the course.

Subject content

  1. Fundamentals of algorithms
  2. Programming
  3. Fundamentals of data representation
  4. Computer systems
  5. Fundamentals of computer networks
  6. Fundamentals of cyber security
  7. Ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital technology on wider society, including issues of privacy
  8. Aspects of software development
  9. Programming project

The Exams

Paper 1: Computational thinking and problem solving

What’s assessed?

Computational thinking, problem solving, code tracing and applied computing as well as theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1–4 above. How it's assessed

Written exam set in practically based scenarios: 1 hour 30 minutes, 80 marks, 50% of GCSE

Paper 2: Written assessment What's assessed?

Theoretical knowledge from subject content 3–7 above.

How it's assessed

Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes, 80 marks, 50% of GCSE

Programming Project

Purpose The programming project develops a student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve a problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving, consistent with the skills described in Section 8 of the subject content. The skills developed can be applied to exam questions on computational thinking

What is produced? -

  • A computer program to solve the programming project
  • Written report: totalling 20 hours of timetabled work

Creative iMedia Level 1/2 Certificate - J817

How is the subject examined? 4 units over the three years each worth 25% of the final grade. One unit is externally examined and the other three are internally assessed

Units Assessment Method
RO81: Preproduction Skills Written Paper - 1 hour 15 minutes
RO82: Creating Digital Graphics Centre Assessed Task: OCR Moderated
RO85: Creating a Multipage Website Centre Assessed Task: OCR Moderated
RO87: Creating Interactive Multimedia Products Centre Assessed Task: OCR Moderated

 

Aims of the Creative iMedia Course

This will assess the application of creative media skills through their practical use. They will provide you with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to you personal development and future economic well-being.

This qualification will encourage independence, creativity and awareness of the digital media sector.

The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will equip you with a range of creative media skills and provide opportunities to develop, in context, desirable, transferable skills such as research, planning, and review, working with others and communicating creative concepts effectively.

The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will also challenge all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and techniques; encouraging independence and creativity and providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of the National Curriculum.

The ‘hands on’ approach that will be required for both teaching and learning has strong relevance to the way young people use the technology required in creative media. It will underpin a highly valid approach to the assessment of your skills as is borne out by what teachers tell us.

What Post 16 choices will this subject lead to?

A great step into accessing ‘A’ Level Media and the OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT (05839)


Sixth Form Course

OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT (05839)

Who is this course for?

This qualification is designed for learners 16 years old or over who want to continue their education through applied learning by developing their knowledge and understanding of the principles of IT and global information systems.

This qualification is suitable for learners who want to gain a Level 3 qualification to support further study in Further Education (FE) or Higher Education (HE) in IT. Looking to gain a Level 3 qualification to support further study in FE or HE in any other sector or subject area and who also want to progress into IT-related apprenticeships.

Structure of the course

360 GLH equivalent to one A level in terms of size
2 x 90 and 3 x 60 GLH units T
hree externally examined units and a choice of two further units which are centre-assessed and moderated by us.

Two examined units will be completed in Year 12 and 1 examined unit plus two coursework in Year 13

Qualification Structure

Learners must achieve a total of a total of two mandatory units.

Assessment method/model

Both units are assessed by exam and marked by the exam board. Your teachers will internally assess all the other units and we will moderate them.

Grading

The units are graded Pass, Merit and Distinction. The qualification is graded P, M, D, D*.

Units

Year 12

  • Unit 1 Fundamentals of IT – externally assessed – 90 hours - mandatory unit
  • Unit 3 Cyber Security – externally assessed – 60 hours - mandatory unit

Year 13

  • Unit 2 Global Information – externally assessed – 90 hours – mandatory unit
  • Unit 8 Project Management – internally assessed – 60 hours – coursework
  • Unit 17 Internet of Everything – internally assessed – 60 hours – coursework

To achieve this qualification there’s mandatory content that all learners must have successfully mastered and it contributes 66.6% to the qualification grade

A Level Computing

The A level Computer Science course is a suitable continuation for students who have already completed a GCSE in computing. There are three parts to the course: 2 exams (worth a total of 80% of the overall marks) and a project (worth 20% of the overall marks) The components and topics of the course are as follows:

01 COMPUTER SYSTEMS

This component will be a traditionally marked and structured question paper with a mix of question types: short-answer, longer-answer, and levels of response mark scheme-type questions. Topics included:

  • The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, output and storage devices
  • Software and software development
  • Exchanging data
  • Data types, data structures and algorithms
  • Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues

02 ALGORITHMS AND PROGRAMMING

This component will be a traditionally marked and structured question paper with two sections, both of which will include a mix of question types: short-answer, longer-answer, and levels of response mark-scheme-type questions.

SECTION A

Traditional questions concerning computational thinking:

  • Elements of computational thinking
  • Programming and problem solving
  • Pattern recognition, abstraction and decomposition
  • Algorithm design and efficiency
  • Standard algorithms.

SECTION B

There will be a scenario/task contained in the paper, which could be an algorithm or a text page-based task, which will involve problem solving.

03 PROGRAMMING PROJECT

Students and/or centres select their own user-driven problem of an appropriate size and complexity to solve. Students will need to analyse the problem, design a solution, implement the solution and give a thorough evaluation.

Teaching Staff
Mr D Thomson
Mr C Penn