Society & EThics

Teaching Staff    
Miss J Thomas - Faculty Leader & Leader of Sociology
Miss S Deeley - Teacher of Religious Education
Miss C Franklin - Leader of Psychology
Miss H Hulse - Teacher of Health and Social Care and Psychology
Mrs S Hartwell - Teacher of Sociology and Health and Social Care
Mr H Jandhu - Teacher of Religious Education
Miss A O'Connor - Teacher of Religious Education
Miss L Roberts - Teacher of Religious Education
Miss S Taylor  - Teacher of Social Sciences

Social Sciences

Health and Social Care

GCSE Health & Social Care

How is the subject examined?

The Edexcel GCSE in Health and Social Care consists of two units - Units 1 and 2.

What will I study?

Unit 1 - Understanding Personal Development and Relationships is externally (1hour 15mins) and makes up 40% of the total GCSE course. In this unit students cover the following:

  • Human growth and Development
  • Factors Affecting Human Growth and Development.
  • Effects of Relationships on Personal Growth and Development.
  • The Effect of Life Events on Personal Development.

Unit 2 - Exploring Health, Social Care and Early Years Provisions. This is internally assessed and makes up 60% of the total GCSE course. In this unit students cover the following:

  • The range of care needs of major client groups.
  • How Health Care, Social Care and Early Years Services are Accessed and Barriers to Access.
  • How Health, Social Care and Early Years are Provided.
  • Workers in Health, Social Care and Early Years.
  • Care Values Which Underpin Service Provider Interaction.

What Post 16 choices will studying this subject lead to? 

Health and Social Care students can further study or train to work in nursing or health care, social work with people of all ages, teaching, nursery or pre-school education

What else should I know about this subject?

Health and Social Care is a challenging subject where written work is very important. You require a good standard of English and a mind which is open to new ideas to be successful in this subject.

By studying Health and Social Care you will develop a range of skills. These will not only be suitable for this subject, but for many others. Included here is:

  • The ability to become more aware about social issues.
  • The ability to work independently.
  • The ability to work effectively as a group.
  • The ability to engage in debates.
  • The ability to analyse, evaluate and to think critically.

Teaching Staff

Miss H Hulse Miss C Franklin  Mrs S Hartwell

Cambridge Technicals: Level 3 Health and Social Care

Learners will follow the OCR specification

Entry Requirements

Students must have achieved a minimum of Grade 5 in English for entry onto this course.

Course Description

The qualification will provide an understanding of the underpinning knowledge of Health and Social Care within the wider contexts of different environments and settings where care takes place, the different individuals that learners might meet and care for or support. They will also become aware of the importance of legislation in health and social care and the principles behind the person-centred approach to care and how this is applied in the workplace.

How is the Course Arranged?

Year 1

  • Component 1- Building positive relationships in health and social care (internally assessed coursework).
  • Component 2- Equality, diversity and rights in health and social care (external examination).
  • Component 3- Health, safety and security in health and social care (external examination).

Year 2

  • Component 4-Anatomy and physiology for health and social care (external examination).
  • Component 13- sexual health, reproduction and early development stages (internally assessed coursework).
  • Component 10- Nutrition for health (internally assessed coursework).

Teaching Staff

Mrs H. Kemp
Miss J Thomas

Psychology

A Level Psychology

The course allows students to explore a wide variety of topic areas within Psychology from memory to schizophrenia. The specification encourages students to develop their knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts and theories and the ability to evaluate these. The way in which Science works and the contributions of Psychology to a modern society is emphasised. Students will also develop skills in designing and conducting research as well as analysing and interpreting data. They are also expected to show an understanding of issues and debates surrounding areas of Psychology.

How is the course arranged and assessed?

Core components:

  1. Social Influence
  2. Memory
  3.  Attachment
  4. Psychopathology
  5. Approaches in Psychology
  6. Biopsychology
  7. Research Methods
  8. Issues and Debates in Psychology

Option 1: Relationships
Option 2: Schizophrenia
Option 3: Aggression

A Level Qualification
  Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3
What is Assessed? Compulsory Content 1-4 Compulsory Content 5-7

Compulsory Content 8

Optional Content, one from Option 1, 9-11, one form Option 2, 12-14, one from option 3, 15-17

Assessment Written Exam: 2 hours
96 marks
33.3% of A Level
Written Exam: 2 hours
96 marks
33.3% of A Level
Written Exam: 2 hours
96 marks
33.3% of A Level
 Types of Questions Section A: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section B: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section C: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section D: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section A: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section B: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section C: Multiple choice, short answer and extended writing: 48 marks

Section A: Multiple choice, shjort answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section B - one topic from Option 1, 9-11: Multiple choice, shjort answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section C - one topic from Option 2, 12-14: Multiple choice, shjort answer and extended writing: 24 marks
Section D - one topic from Option 3: 15-17: Multiple choice, shjort answer and extended writing: 24 marks

 

Teaching Staff

Miss C Franklin, Miss H Hulse, Miss J Thomas

Religious Education

Teaching Staff     
Miss L Roberts (Head of Department)   Miss S Deeley
Miss A O'Connor (Citizenship Coordinator)   Mr H Jandu
 
Key Stage 3:

At KS3 students study RER (Religion, Ethics, and Responsibility) for 2 hours per week. The course has been created using the Coventry Agreed Syllabus for RE and the National Guidelines for Citizenship. The course covers a range of religious, ethical and global issues from the perspective of a number of world religions, and also from a Humanist and non-religious perspective. Students are encouraged to consider these issues from their own perspective and compare their views to the views of others.

Year 7:

1a Change: Changing Perceptions - This unit will introduce you to RER at Coundon Court through a basic introduction to the 6 major world religions and some of the major issues associated with RER
1b Celebration: Active Citizens - A celebration of what it means to be an active citizen in the UK including considering issues of local, national, and global identity.
2a Resolution: Does God exist? - This unit will introduce you to key arguments for and against the existence of God, key beliefs about God from the perspectives of three major world viewpoints (Christianity, Hinduism, and Humanism) and will challenge you to reflect upon and evaluate your own beliefs on the existence of God.
2b Discovery: CSI Jesus - In this unit you will be discovering all about the life of Jesus. You will investigate who he was, what he did, how he died, and about the impact that he had on the world. At the end of the unit you will write up your findings in a report.
3a Society: Law and Justice – In this unit you will be learning about different aspects of British law, justice and punishment. You will compare this with attitudes towards law, justice and punishment around the globe.
3b Place: Making a Difference (to the place where you live) – In this unit you will get a basic introduction to politics, including how government works, electoral processes, and an analysis of the importance of voting. You will also study a range of key religious figures and consider how they have made a difference to the place where they live.

Year 8:

1a – Life: Good and Evil – This unit aims to evaluate the problem of evil (how can all loving, all powerful God exist when there is so much evil and suffering in the world?). You will consider the problem from a range of religious perspectives including, Judeo/Christian, Muslim, Hindu/Buddhist/Sikh, and Humanist, as well as considering the problem from your own perspective.
1b – Balance: Rights and Responsibility – In this unit you will consider the history of human rights and dilemmas that arise relating to human rights and how rights need to be balanced against one another. You will also reflect on a range of issues relating to responsibility within our world such as child poverty and homophobia.
2a – Growth: Growing Up – This unit of work aims to prepare you for the future by considering a range of issues relating to your future goals and life experience. These issues include preparing you for the world of work, and identifying issues relating to money and finance.
2b – World: Conflict in a Modern World – In this unit you will consider causes of conflict within the modern world, using Islamophobia as a main case study. You will explore issues such as media stereotyping, terrorism, racism and discrimination, and freedom of expression.
3a – Culture: What is Religion? – In this unit you will consider the key elements that make up a religion. You will then study a range of smaller, less well known world religious views and consider whether these are religions or not. You will also have the opportunity to design your own religion which focuses on the beliefs and values that are important to you.
3b – Future: Introduction to GCSE Sikhism – This unit provides you with a basic introduction to the religion of Sikhism which is the second religion you study for GCSE (alongside Christianity). You will investigate the History of Sikhism, its key beliefs and teachings, and how these can be applied to modern day.

Key Stage 4:

At KS4 all students study for a full GCSE in Religious Studies. This is taught through 1 lesson per week. The exam board is Edexcel and all content is examined through 2 examinations at the end of year 11. Year 9 and 10 are studying the new Edexcel GCSE specification and Year 11 are studying the legacy Edexcel GCSE examination specification, which will end after this academic year. The course considers a range of religious, ethical, and philosophical issues from a personal viewpoint, a Humanist viewpoint, and from the perspective of two religions. The religions we have chosen to study are Sikhism and Christianity.

Year 9:

  • Marriage and the Family – This unit considers issues relating to marriage and family (family types, marriage/divorce, sex outside of marriage, contraception, and same sex relationships) from a personal, Humanist, and Sikh perspective.
  • Christian Beliefs - In this unit you will learn about the basic beliefs of Christianity including beliefs about God and the Trinity, the creation of the world, the life and teachings of Jesus, and the problem of evil.
  • Living the Sikh Life – In this unit you will learn about some of the beliefs and practices that make up Sikh worship. This includes learning about the Gurdwara, prayer, festivals and celebrations.

Year 10

  1. Peace and Conflict – This unit considers a range of issues relating to peace and conflict (Just War, Pacifism, Forgiveness/Reconciliation) from a personal, Humanist, and Christian perspective. You will also learn about ethical theories such as Situation Ethics and Utilitarianism and consider how these theories can help us to make ethical decisions.
  2. Beliefs – In this unit you will be learning about a range of key beliefs from the Sikh and Christian faith including equality, the life and teachings of religious leaders, and beliefs about life after death.
  3. Crime and Punishment – This unit considers a range of issues relating to crime and punishment (law and order, justice, punishment, capital punishment) from a personal, Humanist, and Christian perspective.

Year 11:

  1. Life and Death – In this unit you will consider a range of issues relating to life and death (beliefs about life after death, abortion, euthanasia) from a personal, Sikh, and Christian perspective.
  2. Environment and Medical Ethics – In this unit you will consider a range of issues relating to environmental and medical ethics (taking care of the environment, stewardship, fertility treatment, transplant surgery) from a personal, Sikh, and Christian perspective.
  3. Recap and Revision – Your final unit will focus on recapping and revising the key topics for the GCSE exams in the summer.
Key Stage 5:

At KS5 students can opt to study for A Level Religious Studies.

Year 12:

Year 12 students are studying the new Edexcel 2 year A Level specification. The units you will study are:

  1. Philosophy
  2. Ethics
  3. Buddhism

Year 13:

Year 13 students are studying the legacy OCR A Level specification, which will end after this academic year. The units of study are:

  1. Ancient Greek and Judaeo Christian influences on philosophy of religion
  2. Traditional Arguments for the existence of God
  3. Challenges to religious belief
  4. Ethical Theories
  5. Applied Ethics, including abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering, and war.

Sociology

KS4 GCSE Sociology

Examining Body: AQA

Course Description

The GCSE course in Sociology is a three year course with 1 full GCSE available at grades A*-G.  The course is broken down into two units of work and is externally assessed.

By choosing this course students will

  • Gain a broad understanding of sociological theories.
  • Gain a better understanding of the society in which they live.
  • Develop the ability to analyse
  • Have the opportunity to develop their skills at debating
  • Develop their abilities as an independent learner

Year 9

This year's focus is on examining the nature of families within society and the nature of education from different perspectives and a consideration of how sociologists use research methods to investigate social issues.

Year 10

This year's focus is placed on how Sociologists use research methods to investigate social issues, explanations of crime and deviance and power

Year 11

This year's focus is on the ntarue of social inequality and a revision programme of all previous topics, (families; education; crime and deviance of power). 

Teaching Staff

Miss J Thomas  Miss S Hartwell

A Level Sociology

Exam Board

AQA

Course Description

Sociology allows for a greater understanding of the society in which we live. It considers what key Sociologists say about external factors within society and how these influence and shape individuals.

Entry Requirements

Students must have achieved a minimum of Grade B GCSE Sociology or similar subject as well as in English for entry onto this course.

Core components:

Compulsory content: Educatioon with theory and methods.
Optional content: Topics in Sociology: Families and households.
Optional content: Topics in Sociology: Beliefs in society.
Compulsory content: Crime and deviance with theory and methods (A Level only).

A Level Qualification
  Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3
What is assessed? Any area from the topic areas of Education with Research Methods. Any area from the topics of Families and Households and Beliefs and Society. Any area from the topics Crime and Deviance and Theory and Methods.
Assessment

2 hours written examination.
80 marks
33.% of A Level

2 hour written examination.
80 marks
33.3% of A Level

2 hours written examination.
80 marks
33.3% of A Level

Types of Question
  • Education: short answer and extended writing - 50 marks.
  • Methods in Context: extended writing - 20 marks.
  • Theory and Methods: extended writing - 10 marks.
  • Families and Households: extended writing - 40 marks.
  • Beliefs in Society: extended writing - 40 marks.
  • Crime and Deviance: short answer and extended writing - 50 marks.
  • Theory and Methods: extended writing - 30 marks.

 

Teaching staff

Miss J Thomas & Miss S Hartwell

Useful Weblinks

AQA (exam board) 
BBC
The Office of National Statistics
The Guardian
The Times
The Daily Telegraph